November 2021

Concrete Septic Tank Benefits For Home Sewer Systems

Tank

It is common for septic tanks to be made from concrete. Some plastic models are becoming popular. These septic tanks will provide a person with easier installation as well as lower upfront costs, they also come with problems. Concrete septic tanks provide the user with years of worry-free operation. There are reasons why a person should choose to have a septic system with a concrete septic tank.

A Natural Process

Commercial waste treatment plants utilize chemicals that are artificial and potentially hazardous. A home septic system involves a completely natural process. The waste generated by a home or business is broken down by healthy bacteria. The waste is then harmless and will not result in any environmental contamination. A septic system does not require any harmful chemicals for its process.

Communicable Diseases

A septic system provides protection from communicable diseases. Proper treatment of household waste products is essential. This is a way to eliminate a disease risk to the surrounding community. Many types of serious illnesses can be spread from contaminated soil and water. A concrete septic tank can eliminate this danger as it provides protection to everyone in the surrounding community. A concrete septic tank will function well and help keep a neighborhood and everyone in it safe from illness.

Corrosion Resistance

Many people point to the durability of plastic, but it can become brittle over time. Metal components will be included in this type of tank. They can rust and result in an expensive leak that will contaminate the surrounding soil. Concrete tanks don’t corrode even during damp weather conditions. They are also very durable. Concrete tanks only require minimal maintenance for them to last for decades.

Additional Weight

Some may think having a heavier septic tank may be a bad thing. This feature may prevent issues from occurring in the future. A plastic septic tank is lighter. It can get pushed upward during the freeze and thaw of soil during the cold months. This may not be a concern in a climate with constant warm weather. If any area experiences a period of extreme cold, this could result in pipes breaking and a disruption of the waste flow through the septic tank. This could cause sewage to be backed up into a house.

Decreased Damage Vulnerability

A plastic septic tank can be damaged during installation. This is especially true when the soil where it is going to be placed is being backfilled. Several issues can occur during a plastic septic tank’s installation and be unnoticed for several years. This is when the damage will become expensive to fix. Concrete has a significantly higher tensile strength when compared to plastic. This means it is much more resistant to being damaged. Concrete septic tanks aren’t going to be damaged from pressure from above like a plastic one. It is more resistant to accidents that could damage a plastic tank.

Government Approval

Many homes are not connected to a main local sewage system. In this case, these homes will be required by law to have some type of septic tank connected to their house. Local, state, and national governments don’t want just any type of septic tank attached to a home. The rules covering the use of plastic septic tanks are different from one state to another. Most governments will approve of having a concrete septic tank attached to a home.

Capacity

If a home has a large family, or there is a multi-unit on the property, a concrete septic tank is the best solution. The reason these types of septic tanks are popular with homes is that they are designed with a large enough capacity to handle large volumes of sewage. It will require less pumping and this will result in a decrease in service costs.

Installation Requirements

Anyone who gets a concrete septic tank will have to have it professionally installed. This is because of their size and weight. These septic tanks are constructed from the heaviest materials available. They are rugged and need to have large, heavy equipment to perform the installation. The majority of concrete septic tanks are manufactured and precast. All of them come in a different size, weight, as well as dimension. They can be made to meet different installation needs. All of the specifications for an installation are approximate. The final product can be changed to meet the requirements of local and state codes.

Long Lifespan

When someone is considering a septic system, they should know that concrete was developed by the Romans. It has been used as waterproof defense against the sea for over a thousand years. Since concrete walls can withstand the oceans for thousands of years, a concrete septic tank will be able to meet the septic needs of any home. Concrete is strong and waterproof. It is used to build bridges, dams, buildings, and more. Concrete is compact, tough, and has proven to be able to stand the test of time.

Weather Storms

There are many areas that experience times of heavy rainfall. This could damage a septic system. Concrete septic tanks do well in such situations. The size of a concrete septic tank results in them having a lower risk of flooding when it rains. Heavy rain can cause plastic tanks to float free from where they have been placed. The weight of a concrete septic tank makes it secured to the ground. It does not move during bad weather.

When it comes to having a septic system, people don’t want to take any chances when it comes to quality. Everyone wants a septic tank that is not going to cause them problems. This is why a concrete septic tank could meet all the waste disposal needs of anyone considering a septic system for their home or business.

Underground Storage Tank Removal Process

Removal of underground storage tanks due to leaking, corrosion or reduced tank integrity is not uncommon. Many households in New England have underground oil tanks with possible contamination that could affect the value of their property.

Most storage tanks are not empty, even if they have been abandoned for some time. And, as they age, they will deteriorate more and potentially begin to leak. This could cause significant damage to your property and the environment.

To avoid any potential leaking and property damage, you will want the tank to be removed and properly disposed of.

However, this is not something you want to do by yourself. Improperly removing an underground storage tank is dangerous. This is why there are both state and federal regulations in place to make sure they are removed in the right way.

This can make the removal process seem daunting, but it is actually not a complicated feat.

The Tank Removal Process

Notify

Your first step is to notify local and state governments of the removal. This needs to be done at least 30 days in advance.

You may also need to notify local municipalities depending on your region.

Enlist a Professionaltank removal company

You’ll then want to find a licensed professional to assist in the removal. It’s important to make sure your professional is licensed and has the proper certifications. These will vary by state, but the main purpose of the professional is to make sure you are meeting all the state regulations.

Drain the Tank

Before you can dig the tank up, you need to make sure it is empty. The materials inside the tank could be flammable or toxic, so it is essential to empty it fully.

Make the Tank Safe

The next step is to make sure the tank won’t explode. Underground storage tanks will often have oxygen left inside them after the materials are removed. Oxygen is a very flammable gas and is perfect fuel for an explosion.

Due to this, you need to remove the oxygen inside the tank and replace it with a non-flammable gas such as nitrogen. This process is also known as making the UST inert.

Dig the Tank Up

Now that it is safe, you can begin to dig the tank up. You’ll want to make sure that the areas above and around the tank are completely cleared. This will give access to the top of the tank and any additional sites that the tank piping may be connected to.

Clean and Remove Tank

After digging it up, you must clean the tank and remove it. There are proper guidelines that must be followed for each step including things such as:

  • cleaning
  • disposal of sludges/liquids
  • disconnecting from pipes
  • removal of potentially contaminated soil

Process Tank for Disposal

Depending on the location, the tank may have to be cut up on site. In most locations, you will also have to dispose of any potentially hazardous material or contaminated soils.

Check & Sample Soil

The soil around the tank needs to be sampled. Samples should be collected from the areas where the tank was sitting and areas near the tank that could have been contaminated.

After the soil is sampled and contamination is determined, the soils may need to be removed and properly disposed of.

Send Required Closure Documentation

After all of this, you will need to submit a Tank Closure Report.

A typical underground storage tank Closure Report will include:

  • results of soil/groundwater sampling
  • maps of where the samples were taken
  • documentation of storage tank disposal
  • documentation of soil/groundwater disposal

Different states will have varying requirements for their Tank Closure Reports. So be sure to check your state’s requirements to ensure you have met their standards.

You may also have to take additional steps depending on the level of contaminants in the soil/groundwater samples. If the contaminants are above the action level, a chemical specific amount set by the EPA, the state will require extra investigations into the area affected.

Conclusions

Leaving underground storage tanks where they are is a potential risk for contamination to the environment and your property. This is why it is important to remove them and even more important to remove them properly.

The EPA has regulations that ensure the removal of any tank, aboveground and below ground, is done safely and with minimum contaminations. They are designed to minimize risk for both you and the environment.

It is important to keep your documentation of the tank removal as they will be required for any future sales of the property. Well-documented reports will help you close sales quickly and efficiently.